SECURITY

At First Investors, we recognize the sensitive nature of your financial information and take appropriate precautions to protect your privacy. We are committed to the security of your account and personal information and want to keep your account safe from unauthorized access. To that end, we maintain an information safeguards program. As part of these programs, we have implemented a Security Plan to Protect Customer Information that contains our policies, procedures, safeguards and internal controls designed to:

(i) protect customer information from misuse or unauthorized access,
(ii) ensure the proper disposal of customer information, and
(iii) allow compliance with applicable local, state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to safeguarding and proper disposal of customer information.

As part of our commitment, we are dedicated to helping you protect yourself from fraud and identity theft. Please be advised that we promptly investigate any reported suspicious activity. Therefore, please contact us immediately as indicated below if you suspect fraud or identity theft or if you notice any suspicious activity involving your First Investors account. Also, please be aware of the following:


Debt Reduction or Loan Modification Companies

First Investors does not maintain relationships with debt reduction or loan modification companies. These companies often falsely promise financially distressed consumers that that they are able to reduce their loan payments or interest rate. These companies also often charge up-front fees for their services. If you are experiencing financial difficulties, please contact First Investors directly to discuss your specific situation to see what options may exist. Never pay a debt reduction or loan modification company for the purpose of modifying your account with First Investors and never believe them if they tell you that they have a relationship with us.


E-Mail Fraud

All Internet users should be aware of the online scam known as "phishing" (pronounced "fishing"). Phishing involves the use of e-mail messages that appear to come from your bank or another trusted business, but are actually from imposters. Phishing involves an e-mail that appears to be from a legitimate business or organization; however, in reality, it is a fraudulent attempt to acquire sensitive information, such as your Social Security number, credit card number, bank account number or other personal information, for financial gain or identity theft. In a typical phishing attempt, the phisher sends an e-mail or pop-up message that claims to be from a business or organization with which you maintain a relationship, such as a financial institution or a government agency. The message may ask you to “update,” “validate,” or “confirm” your account information. Some phishing e-mails threaten dire consequences if you do not respond, such as the initiation of legal action. The message may also direct you to a web site that looks just like a legitimate business or organization’s web site (this is known as spoofing); however, it is a fraudulent web site whose sole purpose is to trick you into divulging your sensitive information so the operators can steal your identity.

Although the e-mail used in a phishing attempt or used to direct you to a spoofed web site is designed to look like a legitimate e-mail, there are some common signs for which you can look:

  • They urge the recipient to click on a link to update or verify account information.
  • They convey a sense of urgency and often mention adverse consequences for failing to respond.
  • They do not contain any personalization, such as the recipient’s name, the last four digits of their account number, or other information that demonstrates the sender has a relationship with the recipient.
  • They are unexpected and are not consistent with other e-mails, if any, received from the business or organization.
  • They often contain spelling errors and bad grammar.

If you receive a suspicious e-mail:

  • Do not respond to the e-mail and do not click on the link found in it.
  • If you are unsure of its authenticity, call a telephone number for the actual business or organization that you trust, such as the one on a recent billing statement (NOT the one in the e-mail), to verify that the business or organization actually sent it and to inquire about why they need your information.

Sensitive information should NEVER be provided via e-mail unless you are the party who initiated the contact or know exactly with whom you are communicating.


Remember, legitimate businesses and organizations with which you maintain a relationship already have all the information they need about you. If you receive an e-mail purporting to be from First Investors and you are unsure if it is legitimate, please call us using a telephone number that you know is ours (e.g., on your servicing statement) prior to responding to it.


Telephone Fraud

Vishing, short for voice phishing, is related to phishing in that the scam involves a fraudulent e-mail. With vishing, the imposter sends an e-mail to you that appears to be from a legitimate business or organization; however, in reality, it is a fraudulent attempt to acquire sensitive information, such as your Social Security number, credit card number, bank account number or other personal information, for financial gain or identity theft. In a typical vishing attempt, the e-mail will contain a telephone number that you are directed to call to resolve an issue or to update your account. When you call the telephone number, you will be directed to provide personal information to an automated voice prompt or to a live person so the operators can steal your identity. Once again, if you receive an e-mail purporting to be from First Investors and you are unsure if it is legitimate, please call us using a telephone number that you know is ours (e.g., on your servicing statement) prior to responding to it.


If you receive a suspicious e-mail directing you to call a telephone number:

  • Do not respond to the e-mail and do not call the telephone number.
  • If you are unsure of its authenticity, call a telephone number for the actual business or organization that you trust, such as the one on a recent billing statement (NOT the one in the e-mail), to verify that the business or organization actually sent it and to inquire about why they need your information.

Another form of telephone fraud is pretexting. Pretexting is the practice of obtaining your personal information under false pretenses. Pretexters fraudulently acquire sensitive information, such as your Social Security number, credit card number, bank account number or other personal information, for financial gain or identity theft. Pretexters use a variety of tactics to get your personal information. For example, a pretexter may call, claim he is from your financial institution, and ask you for your name, address, birth date, and Social Security number. When the pretexter has the information he wants, he is able steal your identity.


Sensitive information should NEVER be provided via telephone, unless you are the party who initiated the contact or know exactly with whom you are communicating. Remember, legitimate businesses with which you maintain a relationship already have all the information they need about you.


Protect Yourself

We recommend that you take the following precautions to guard against the unauthorized use of your information:

  • Properly dispose of documents and paperwork containing sensitive information (e.g., financial documents) by shredding them and never place the unshredded documents in your garbage.
  • Protect your Social Security number by not carrying your Social Security card in your wallet and by disclosing it only if absolutely necessary.
  • Do not give out sensitive information on the telephone, through the mail, or over the Internet unless you initiated the contact and know exactly with whom you are dealing.
  • Never click on links sent in unsolicited e-mails and use up-to-date firewalls, anti-spyware, and anti-virus software to protect your home computer.
  • Do not use an obvious password like your birth date, your mother’s maiden name, or the last four digits of your Social Security number.
  • Keep your sensitive information in a secure place at home, especially if you have roommates, employ outside help, or are having work done in your house.
  • Detect suspicious activity by routinely monitoring your financial accounts and billing statements.
  • Report any suspicious activity to the appropriate parties (e.g., your financial institution and law enforcement) immediately.

For more information about deterring, detecting and defending against identity theft, please visit the following web site operated by the Federal Trade Commission:
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/feature-0014-identity-theft
Also, please read the Identity Theft Brochure designed to assist consumers in preventing and resolving identity theft.


If you believe that you have been a victim of identity theft, then we recommend that you notify any one of the nationwide consumer reporting companies to place a fraud alert on your credit report and your local police or the police in the community where the identity theft took place. You may also want to visit the Federal Trade Commission’s Identity Theft Web Site via the following link:
https://www.identitytheft.gov/Steps


Contact Us - To report a suspicious e-mail or telephone call that purports to be from First Investors or that uses First Investors’ name, please contact us toll-free immediately at 1-800-249-6305. Also, please forward any suspicious e-mails to us at reportfraud@fifsg.com.
Alert a Consumer Reporting Company with Your Concerns - If you suspect that you might be a victim of identity theft, contact the three major credit bureaus listed below to place a fraud alert on your credit file:


Equifax:

Experian:

TransUnion: